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Pratt, Harvey P. | 2021

  • Birth and Death Year |
  • Induction Year | 2021
  • Profession | Law Enforcement / Artist
  • Oklahoma Connection | Pratt served in law enforcement in Oklahoma for 50 years, and is a Native American artist who is friends with fellow Oklahoma Hall of Fame members, artist Mike Larsen and Justice Yvonne Kauger.
  • Hometown | El Reno

Fun Fact

Pratt is a Southern Cheyenne Peace Chief.

Quote

“I am a composite of everyone I've ever met.” - Harvey P. Pratt, 2021

Bio

From El Reno, Harvey Pratt is a self-taught artist who works in oil, watercolor, metal, clay, and wood. His works include themes of Native American history and tradition and the Cheyenne people. A self-taught Oklahoma artist and Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal Member, Pratt was selected to create the Smithsonian’s National Native American Veterans Memorial for the National Museum of the American Indian. Unveiled in 2020, “Warriors’ Circle of Honor” brings together 573 federally recognized tribes and is the only monument or memorial by an Oklahoman on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

Beginning his career in law enforcement with the Midwest City Police Department and retiring from the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, Pratt’s career spanned more than 50 years. He developed a fingerprint and records system and was promoted to detective. A nationally and internationally recognized expert in forensic art, Pratt has been involved in many high profile cases. He has brought closure to the families of loved ones and assisted in the capture of the most notorious criminals. A U. S. Marine in Air Rescue and Security from 1962 to 1965, during Vietnam he was stationed at Da Nang Air Base and rescued pilots who had been shot down.

An inductee to the Oklahoma Law Enforcement Hall of Fame, Oklahoma Military Hall of Fame, and the Oklahoma State Bureau Hall of Fame, Pratt also has been recognized by the Cheyenne People as an outstanding Southern Cheyenne and was inducted as a traditional Cheyenne Peace Chief—the Cheyenne Nation’s highest honor. Pratt currently serves as chairperson of the Indian Arts and Crafts Board of the U.S. Department of the Interior and is past commander of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Post 401 in Clinton. Pratt continues to paint, including commission pieces, and his works are found in collections worldwide.